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Interesting Facts
  1. 100,000 years ago, the human gestation period was 15 months.
  2. 19th century tooth powder often contained porcelain, smashed coral or cuttlefish bone.
  3. 100,000 cubic feet of water pours over the Niagra Falls every se
  4. 2,500 lefties die each year using products designed for righties.
  5. 27% of U.S. male college students believe life is a meaningless existential hell.
  6. 4,000 people are injured by teapots each year.
  7. 40% of McDonald's profits come from the sales of Happy Meals.
  8. 54% of Americans prefer to fold their toilet paper rather than wad it.
  9. 82% of the workers on the Panama Canal suffered from malaria.
  10. 83% of people hit by lightning are men.
  11. 99% of the solar systems mass is concentrated in the sun.
  12. A baby in Florida was named: Truewilllaughinglifebuckyboomermanifestdestiny. His middle name is George James.
  13. A baby is born every seven seconds.
  14. A baby oyster is called a spat.
  15. A barking dog is not usually a sign of aggressive behavior. Barking is the domesticated dogs' alarm to others in his pack--canine or human--that something is wrong or that an intruder is present. It is the silent, snarling or growling dog that is actually most dangerous.
  16. A barnacle has the largest penis of any other animal in the world in relation to its size.
  17. A bear has 42 teeth.
  18. A blind chameleon still changes colors to match his enviroment.
  19. A bowling pin only has to tilt 7.5 degrees in order to fall down.
  20. A building in Belgium was taxed if there was a street light on it...unless a statue of the Virgin Mary were place above it. Hence, there are no buildings in the city without a statue of the Virgin Mary.
  21. A butterfly has 12,000 eyes.
  22. A can of Spam is opened every 4 seconds.
  23. A cat has 32 muscles in each ear.
  24. A cat in Japan says neow.
  25. A cat in Thailand says mao.
  26. A cat is more inclined to watch TV than a dog, says the experts. (A cat relies more on vision, less on smell.)
  27. A chameleon's tongue is twice the length of its body.
  28. A clue originally meant a ball of thread. Hence, one unravels the clues of a mystery.
  29. A cockroach can live several weeks with its head cut off.
  30. A cow in Thailand says oo-ah.
  31. A cow's only sweat glands are in its nose.
  32. A dime has 118 ridges around the edge.
  33. A dog can suffer from tonsillitis, but not appendicitis. They don't have an appendix.
  34. A dog can't hear the lowest key on a piano.
  35. A dog in Bangkok says bahk-bahk.
  36. A dog in East Africa says woo-woo.
  37. A dog in Japan says wan-wan.
  38. A dog in Russia says gahf-gahft.
  39. A duck's quack doesn't echo, and no one knows why.
  40. A duffer is Australian slang for a cattle thief.
  41. A eunuch can't grow a beard.
  42. A face-off in hockey used to be called a puck-off, but was soon changed for obvious reasons.
  43. A fireplace is called a mantelpiece because at one time people hung their coats (or mantles) over the fireplace to dry them.
  44. A fog belt 50 ft. deep over an area of 104 square miles contains no more moisture that single bucket of water.
  45. A fully loaded supertanker travelling at normal speed takes a least 20 minutes to stop.
  46. A giraffe can go without water longer than a camel.
  47. A giraffe's blood pressure is at least twice that of a healthy man.
  48. A goldfish has a memory span of 3 seconds.
  49. A group of bears is called a sleuth.
  50. A group of kangaroos is called a mob.
  51. A group of owls is called a parliament.
  52. A group of ravens is called a murder.
  53. A group of unicorns is called a blessing.
  54. A hippopotamus can open its mouth wide enough to accommodate a 4-foot-tall child.
  55. A hippopotamus can run faster than a man.
  56. A hockey puck is three inches in diameter, one inch thick and weighs 5.5 to 6 ounces.
  57. A jiffy is an actual unit of time. It is 1/100 of a second.
  58. A kangaroo can only jump if its tail is touching the ground.
  59. A law passed in Nebraska in 1912 really set down some hard rules of the road. Drivers in the country at night were required to stop every 150 yards, send up a skyrocket, then wait eight minutes for the road to clear before proceeding cautiously, all the while blowing their horn and shooting off flares.
  60. A mule won't sink in quicksand but a donkey will.
  61. A new book is published every 13 minutes in America.
  62. A newborn expels its own body weight in waste every 60 hours.
  63. A newborn turkey chick has to be taught to eat, or it will starve.
  64. A normal spider has about 600 silk glands on its body that it uses to spin its web.
  65. A pencil will write in zero gravity, upside down and under water.
  66. A person cannot taste food unless it is mixed with saliva.
  67. A person swallows approx. 295 times while eating dinner.
  68. A person usually chews a piece of gum 5,500 times before spitting it out.
  69. A pig in Russia says ha-roo.
  70. A pig in Thailand says oot-oot.
  71. A pig Japan says moo-moo.
  72. A poem written to celebrate a wedding is called a epithalamium.
  73. A quarter has 119 grooves around the edge.
  74. A rat can go without water longer than a camel can.
  75. A room with bath is perpetually reserved in one of Java's best hotels for the goddess of the South Sea, Njai Loro Kidul.
  76. A rooster in Germany says ay-ee-ache-ache.
  77. A scallop has 35 blue eyes.
  78. A scorpion could survive for three weeks if it was embedded in a block of ice.
  79. A seagull drinks salt water because it has special glands that filter out the salt.
  80. A shark can detect one part of blood in 100 million parts of water.
  81. A six-pound sea hare can lay 40,000 eggs in a single minute.
  82. A sixteenth English law allowed men to beat their wives--but only before 10 p.m.
  83. A snail's reproductive organs are in its head.
  84. A sneeze can travel as fast as 100 miles per hour.
  85. A sport practiced in ancient China consisted of placing two angry male quails in a large glass bowl and watching as the creatures clawed each other to death.
  86. A square foot of lawn has 3,000 blades of grass. A square foot of fairway has 4,500. A putting green has close to 8,000.
  87. A squid has 10 tentacles.
  88. A stingray never actually sees the food as it eats, since its eyes are on top of its head and its mouth and nostrils are on the bottom.
  89. A stretched out Slinky is 87 feet long.
  90. A thick glass more likely to crack if hot water is poured onto it than a thin one.
  91. A toothpick is the object most often choked on by Americans.
  92. A whale's penis is called a dork.
  93. Abdul Kassem Ismael, Grand Vizier of Persia in the tenth century, carried his library with him wherever he went. The 117,000 volumes were carried by 400 camels trained to walk in alphabetical order.
  94. About 10 million people share your birthday.
  95. Abraham Lincoln was the only U.S. president ever granted a patent.
  96. According to a British law passed in 1845, attempting to commit suicide was a capital offense. The pushishment? The offense was punishable by hanging.
  97. According to acupuncturists, there is a point on the head that you can press to control your appetite. It is located in the hollow just in front of the flap of the ear.
  98. According to Archives of General Medicine, coffee drinkers have sex more frequently and enjoy it more than non-coffee drinkers.
  99. According to Genesis 3:6, it was not Adam, but Eve who first ate the forbidden fruit.
  100. According to scientists, gold exists on Mars, Mercury and Venus.
  101. According to tests made at the Institute for the Study of Animal Problems in Washington, D.C., dogs and cats, like people, are either right-handed or left-handed--that is, they favor either their right or left paws.
  102. According to the Food and Drug Administration, two out of five women in America dye their hair.
  103. Acting was once considered to be evil, and the actors in the first English play to be performed in America were arrested.
  104. Adolph Hitler was Time's Man of the Year for 1938.
  105. African witch doctors only send their patients a bill if they expect them to live.
  106. After eating too much, your hearing is less sharp.
  107. After his sight improved, Thomas Edison still preferred using Braille to more normal reading.
  108. Alaska could hold the 21 smallest States.
  109. Albert Einstein's last words will never be known. He spoke them in German, and the attending nurse did not speak German.
  110. Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, also set a world water-speed record of over 70 miles an hour at the age of 72.
  111. Alexander the Great made his soldiers keep clean-shaven so the enemy couldn't grab them by the beards and stab them with their swords.
  112. Alfred Butts, the inventor of Scrabble, decided on the frequency and distribution of letters by analyzing the front page of the New York Times. He used a penknife to cut his first set of wooden Scrabble tiles.
  113. Alfred Hitchcock had no belly button for it was eliminated during surgery.
  114. All of the clocks in the movie Pulp Fiction are stuck on 4:20.
  115. All the planets in our solar system could be placed inside the planet Jupiter.
  116. Allan Pinkerton, founder of the famous detective agency, died in 1884 when he stumbled, bit his own tongue, and was killed by the resulting gangrene.
  117. Allied bombers were issued with Biro pens as fountain pens leaked at high altitude.
  118. Almonds are a member of the peach family.
  119. Almost is the longest word in the English language with all the letters in alphabetical order.
  120. Although Buddhism began and first flourished in India, it had by 1200 all but disappeared there, but had won huge numbers of followers in Ceylon, Burma, Thailand, China and Japan.
  121. America once issued a 5-cent bill.
  122. Americans eat 134 pounds of sugar a year.
  123. Americans eat 18 billion hot dogs a year.
  124. Americans spend around $3 billion for cat and dog food a year.
  125. America's best selling ice cream flavor is vanilla.
  126. Among the Jews of ancient Palestine, there was a specific dietary proscription against mousemeat.
  127. An atomic clock can be made accurate to one second in every 150,000 years.
  128. An egg’s shell accounts for about 12 percent of its weight.
  129. An iguana can stay under water for 28 minutes.
  130. An Oscar weighs seven pounds.
  131. An ostrich's eye is bigger than its brain.
  132. Animal breeders in Russia once claimed to have bred sheep with blue wool.
  133. Anise is the scent on the artificial rabbit that is used in greyhound races.
  134. Anyone who felled a hazel or apple tree was sentenced to death in ancient Ireland, where these trees were considered sacred.
  135. Apart from its vulnerability to fire, human hair is almost impossible to destroy. It decays at a very slow rate, so slow that is almost non-disintegrative. It can't be destroyed by cold, change of climate, water, etc., and it is resistant to many kinds of acids and corrosive materials.
  136. Apples are more effective at keeping people awake in the morning than caffeine.
  137. As early as 246 B.C., con men were at work aging manuscripts and selling them to book collectors as antiques.
  138. Assuming Rudolph was in front, there are 40,320 ways to arrange the other eight reindeer.
  139. At any one time there are 1,800 thunderstorms taking place in the world.
  140. At any one time, there are 100 million phone conversations going on in the United States.
  141. At one time, Martin Luther was the recognized authority on evicting the Devil. Satan pestered Luther with frequent visits and even showered him with hickory nuts on one occasion. The militant leader of the Reformation had other means of dealing with the Devil. In one encounter, Luther threw dung in the Devil's face. In another, he broke wind at him.
  142. At sea level there are 2,000 pounds of air pressure on each square foot of your body.
  143. Athletic supporters were introduced in 1874 to help bicycle riders as they pedaled over cobblestone roads. The term jock strap comes from these early bicycle jockeys.
  144. Average lifespan of a major league baseball: 7 pitches.
  145. Average number of days a West German goes without washing his underwear: 7.
  146. Average number of people airborne over the U.S. at any given hour: 61,000.
  147. Average people airborne over the US any given hour: 61,000.
  148. Babe was played by over 48 pigs.
  149. Babies are born without kneecaps. They appear when the child is 2-6 years of age.
  150. Bambi was originally published in 1929 in German.
  151. Band-Aid bandages first appeared on the market in 1921, however, the little red string that is used to open the package did not get added until 1940.
  152. Barbers at one time combined shaving and haircutting with bloodletting and pulling teeth. The white stripes on a field of red on a barber pole represent the bandages used in the bloodletting.
  153. Barbie's measurements if she were lifesize: 39-23-33.
  154. Basketball: The Miami Heat, The Utah Jazz, The Orlando Magic. Baseball: The Boston Red Sox, The Chicago White Sox. Hockey: The Colorado Avalanche, The Tampa Bay Lightning. Football: None.
  155. Beaver Cleaver's locker number is 9.
  156. Because it has no backbone, a seventy-pound octopus can squeeze through a hole the size of a silver dollar.
  157. Because its tongue is too short for its beak, the toucan must juggle its food before swallowing it.
  158. Because metal was scarce, the Oscars given out during World War II were made of wood.
  159. Because of Animal Crackers, many kids until they reach the age of ten, believe a bear is as tall as a giraffe.
  160. Because of his poor health, Benjamin Franklin needed help to sign the Constitution. As he did so, tears streamed down his face.
  161. Because of the rotation of the earth, an object can be thrown farther if it is thrown west.
  162. Because steel expands when it gets hot, the Eiffel Tower is 6 inches taller in the summer than in the winter.
  163. Beelzebub, another name for the devil, is Hebrew for Lord of the Flies, and this is where the book's title comes from.
  164. Beethoven poured ice water over his head when he sat down to create music, believing it stimulated his brain.
  165. Before 1850 golf balls were made of leather and stuffed with feathers.
  166. Before 1859, baseball umpires sat behind home plate in rocking chairs.
  167. Before American football players venture on to the field, they don about 13 pounds of protective clothing.
  168. Before Prohibition, Shlitz Brewery owned more property in Chicago than anyone else, except the Catholic church.
  169. Before the Chinese takeover of Tibet in 1952, 25 percent of the males in the country were Buddhist monks.
  170. Bela Lugosi was buried, as he requested, in his famous Dracula cape.
  171. Benjamin Franklin compiled a list of more than 200 synonyms for drunk, including cherry-merry, nimptopsical and soaked.
  172. Benjamin Franklin invented crop insurance.
  173. Benjamin Franklin invented the rocking chair.
  174. Birds played a role in aerial warfare during World War I. Because of their acute hearing, parrots were kept on the Eiffel Tower to warn of approaching aircraft long before the planes were heard or seen by human spotters.
  175. Blue and white are the most common school colors.
  176. Blue whales weigh as much as 30 elephants and are as long as three Greyhound buses.
  177. Bookkeeper and bookkeeping are the only words in the English language with three consecutive double letters.
  178. Bookstore owners in Raleigh, North Carolina, contend that the volume most often stolen year after year is the Bible.
  179. Brasco is Australian slang for lavatory.
  180. Breath, by Samuel Beckett, was first performed in April, 1970. The play lasts thirty seconds, has no actors, and no dialogue.
  181. Bulls are color blind.
  182. Butterflies taste with their hind feet.
  183. Buzz Aldrin was the second man to set foot on the Moon. Moon was also his mother's maiden name.
  184. By law, employees do not have to wash hands after sneezing.
  185. By some unknown means, an iguana can end its own life.
  186. By the way, the Canary Islands were so named because of the many wild dogs which roamed it when the Romans landed there. (Recall, dog in Latin was canis...so they called the islands canaria insula--the island of dogs.)
  187. Cacao, the main ingredient of chocolate is the most pest-ridden tree in the jungle.
  188. Calling a puppy to punish it teaches the dog not to come when it's called. It's best to reward your dog by bringing it to you, and to punish it by sending away.
  189. Camel meat is a great delicacy in Egypt.
  190. Canada has more lakes than the rest of the world.
  191. Canada's coastline is six times longer than that of Australia.
  192. Cashews are botanically classified as the seed of a tropical and semitropical fruit called the cashew apple.
  193. Cat urine glows under a black light.
  194. Cats spend over half their lives asleep.
  195. Celery has negative calories! It takes more calories to eat a piece of celery than the celery has in it to begin with.
  196. Chaetophobia: a fear of hair.
  197. Charles Dickens was an insomniac. He believed he had the best chance of getting some sleep if he positioned himself exactly in the middle of the bed which must at all times be pointed in a northerly direction.
  198. Chickens can't swallow while they are upside down.
  199. Children grow faster in the springtime.
  200. China claims to possess the world’s smallest town—Yumen. This town, in Tibet, has only three residents--an elderly man and his two daughters. The town has a local council, chief executive and an official seal.
  201. Cicadas have their hearing organs in their stomachs, at the base of the abdomen. Crickets have their hearing organs in their knees, or, more precisely, in the oval slit of their forelegs.
  202. Cinderella is known as Tuna in Finland.
  203. City with the most Rolls Royces per capita: Hong Kong.
  204. Clans of long ago that wanted to get rid of their unwanted people without killing them would burn their houses down--hence the expression to get fired.
  205. Clocks made before 1687 had only one hand, and hour hand.
  206. Coca-Cola was originally green.
  207. Columbia University is the second largest landowner in New York City, after the Catholic Church.
  208. Confucius was the eleventh child of a 70-year-old soldier.
  209. Connecticut and Rhode Island never ratified the 18th Amendment (Prohibition).
  210. Copies of the Bible and the Koran small enough to fit in a walnut shell have been written by hand.
  211. Cost of raising a medium size dog to the age of 11: $6,400.
  212. Cranberry Jell-0 is the only kind that contains real fruit.
  213. Crocodiles and alligators are surprisingly fast on land. Although they are rapid, they are not agile; so if you ever find yourself chased by one, run in a zigzag line. You'll lose him or her every time.
  214. Crocodiles can see underwater because they have a semi-transparent third eyelid that slides into place when necessary.
  215. Crocodiles kill 2,000 people each year.
  216. Dante, Christopher Marlow, Daniel Defoe, Andrew Marvell and Lord Byron all acted as government spies.
  217. Denmark has the oldest national flag in the world.
  218. Dog food is the most profitable food on the market. People spend four times as much on dog food as they do on baby food.
  219. Dog kennel is redundant. The Latin canis (dog) served as the base for the word canile (dog house.) This word entered French as kenel, which the English changed to kennel. Thus, a kennel couldn't technically be for anything else but dogs.
  220. DOG TRIVIA
  221. Doggie urine damages grass, shrubs and other plant life due to urine burn. It's caused by ammonia and urea contained in canine urine. The urine makes the soil too acidic.
  222. Dogs and humans are the only animals with prostates.
  223. Dogs aren't as mean in England as in other places. A United Nations survey showed that, based upon the fact that fewer British mailmen are bitten by dogs there than in any other nation.
  224. Dogs don't sweat with their tongues as is often said. The only sweat glands of significance on a dog are in the soles of their feet. Dogs cool themselves primarily by rapid breathing, which is why they pant after running. When a dog sticks its tongue out, he does so because it is moist and evaporation helps to cool it...not because he is sweating.
  225. Dogs in the wild seldom, if ever, bark. Only those dogs who have come into contact with humans or other domesticated dogs exhibit this behavior. Wolves, foxes, wild dogs and other canines only howl, growl, snarl, yelp or whine, but do not bark. The reason for this is not known, but it is believed the barking sounds of domesticated dogs are an attempt to imitate human sounds.
  226. Dogs might nip at a toad, but they won't eat them. The experts suspect that there's something emitted from the toad's skin that makes the dog let go instantly.
  227. Dogs put their heads out of car windows out of visual curiosity. (They like a cool breeze, too.) But blowing in a dog's ear is another matter. It can be painful because of the sound of the blowing--the frequency drives them nuts.
  228. Dogs tilt their heads when you talk to them because they want you to know they are listening-- without staring at you (as that's a sign of aggression.) The tilt might also aide them in seeing us better, as each of their eyes sees half the world with little overlap in the fields of vision.
  229. Dolphins sleep with one eye open.
  230. Dolphins swim in circles while they sleep with the eye on the outside of the circle open to keep watch for predators. After a certain amount of time they reverse and swim in the opposite direction with the opposite eye open.
  231. Dr. James Barry qualified as a doctor, enlisted in the army and became an Inspector-General. It was only at the time of his death in 1865 that it was discovered he was actually a woman.
  232. Dr. Seuss and Kurt Vonnegut went to college together.
  233. Dr. Seuss pronounced Seuss so it rhymed with rejoice.
  234. Drivers tend to drive faster when other cars are around.
  235. Dry fish food can make goldfish constipated.
  236. Duffel bags are named after a town of Duffel, Belgium, where they were first made.
  237. During a severe windstorm or rainstorm the Empire State Building may sway several feet to either side.
  238. During Abraham Lincoln's campaign for the presidency, a dyed-in-the-wool Democrat named Valentine Tapley from Pike County, Missouri, swore that he would never shave again if Abe were elected. Tapley kept his word and his chin whiskers went unshorn from November 1860 until he died in 1910, attaining a length of twelve feet six inches.
  239. During its lifetime an oyster changes its sex from male to female and back several times.
  240. During the 1905 football season, eighteen men were killed in college games in the U.S., 159 were permanently injured.
  241. During the 1918-1919 season, the Stanley Cup playoffs were halted by the worldwide influenza epidemic.
  242. During the film Don Juan, John Barrymore delivers a grand total of 191 kisses to a variety of different women, at the rate of one every 53 seconds.
  243. During the high Middle Ages, there was, on the average, a church for every 200 people.
  244. During the Middle Ages, nearly a third of every year was given over to religious holidays.
  245. During the Renaissance, fashionable aristocratic Italian women shaved their hair several inches back from their natural hairlines.
  246. During the time of Peter the Great, any Russian man who had a beard was required to pay a special tax.
  247. During World War II, Americans had the idea of fitting bats with miniature bombs that would then be dropped as they flew over the enemy.
  248. During World War II, U.S. bakers were ordered to stop selling sliced bread for the duration of the war on January 18, 1943. Only whole loaves were made available to the public. It was never explained how this action helped the war effort.
  249. E is the most frequently used letter in the English alphabet, Q the least.
  250. Each day 100 or more whales are killed by fishermen.
  251. Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king from history. Spades--King David, Clubs--Alexander the Great, Hearts--Charlemange and Diamonds--Julius Caesar.
  252. Each square inch of human skin consists of sixty hairs. Not to mention 90 oil glands. And 19,000 sensory cells.
  253. Edward III passed a law stopping people eating more than two meals a day.
  254. Eggs are sold on bits of string in Korea.
  255. Electricity doesn't move through a wire but through a field around the wire.
  256. Elephants have been known to remain standing after they die.
  257. Emus can't walk backwards.
  258. Enough beer is poured every Saturday across America to fill the Orange Bowl.
  259. Ernest Vincent Wright wrote a novel with over 50,000 words, none of which containing the letter e.
  260. Eskimos don't gamble.
  261. Even well educated people use only about one percent of the possible words in the English language when talk to each other.
  262. Every continent in the world contains a city called Rome.
  263. Every day more money is printed for Monopoly than the U.S. treasury.
  264. Every hour, 12,500 puppies are born in the United States.
  265. Every major league baseball team in the U.S. buys about eighteen thousand baseballs each season.
  266. Every minute in the U.S. six people turn 17.
  267. Every time you lick a stamp you consume 1/10 of a calorie.
  268. Every year in France there is a Thieves Fair, where people are encouraged to try to steal things from the stalls--if they think they can get away with it.
  269. Every year the sun loses 360 million tons.
  270. Every year, Americans dispose of 1.6 billion pens.
  271. Fine turkey and honeycomb are terms used for different qualities and textures of sponges.
  272. First novel ever written on a typewriter: Tom Sawyer.
  273. Flies take off backwards.
  274. Florida's beaches lose 20 million cubic yards of sand annually.
  275. foods that increase in nutritional value as they decompose.
  276. For a short time in 1967, the American Typers Association made a new punctuation mark that was a combination of the question mark and an exclamation point called an interrobang. It was rarely used and hasn't been seen since.
  277. For a while Frederic Chopin, the composer and pianist, wore a beard on only one side of his face. It does not matter, he explained. My audience sees only my right side.
  278. For several centuries, women used to rub crushed strawberries on their breasts in the belief that it would enlarge them.
  279. Forty-seven Bibles are sold or distributed throughout the world every minute of the day.
  280. France has the highest per capita consumption of cheese.
  281. Fresca, the soft drink, had problems when it was sold in Mexico. There, Fresca is slang for lesbian.
  282. Gabriel Fahrenheit invented the mercury thermometer.
  283. Gale warnings were first issued in 1861.
  284. Gandhi slept naked with women in order to test his mastery of celibacy.
  285. Gene Cernan was the last man on the moon.
  286. General U.S. Grant owned slaves.
  287. George Bernard Shaw refused an Oscar in 1938, for the screenplay Pygmalion.
  288. George Gershwin suffered from chronic constipation for most of his life.
  289. George Washington Carver invented peanut butter.
  290. Goethe could only write if he had an apple rotting in the drawer of his desk.
  291. Goldfish swallowing started at Harvard in 1939.
  292. Granite conducts sound ten times faster than air.
  293. Greece's national anthem has 158 verses.
  294. Grenade-throwing is an official sporting event in the People's Republic of China.
  295. Greyhounds have the keenest eyesight of any dog breed.
  296. Hair grows about 0.01 inch every day.
  297. Hair is made up of dead tissue.
  298. HAIR TRIVIA
  299. Half of all the different types of flowers in the world can be found in South America.
  300. Half the foods eaten throughout the world today were developed by farmers in the Andes Mountains. Potatoes, maize, sweet potatoes, squash, all varieties of beans, peanuts, manioc (manioc?), papayas, strawberries, mulberries and many other foods were first grown in this region.
  301. Half the peanuts grown in America are used for peanut butter.
  302. Half the world exists on a basic diet of rice.
  303. Hang on Snoopy is the official rock song of Ohio.
  304. Hat trick comes from cricket, where at one time, if a player scored three consecutive wickets, he was awarded a hat.
  305. Henry Ford experimented with soy. Many of the meals served in his home consisted of his soy creations.
  306. Henry I decided that a yard should be the distance from his thumb to the end of his nose.
  307. Henry Thoreau’s nose was so long be could swallow it.
  308. Here is the literal translation of one of the standard traffic signs in China. It reads: Give large space to the festive dog that makes sport in the roadway.
  309. Hilary Clinton once said We are the President.
  310. Hockey doesn't even make it onto the list of the top 10 most dangerous sports—they are: football, skiing, baseball, swimming and basketball.
  311. Hockey pucks travel at speed of up to 100 miles an hour.
  312. Honey is the only food that doesn't spoil.
  313. Honey is used as the center of some golf balls.
  314. Horse-racing regulations state that no race horse's name may contain more than 18 letters. (Actually, it's 18 letters or spaces, total.) Names that are too long would be cumbersome on racing sheets.
  315. Horses can sleep standing up.
  316. How many cars can drive side by side on the Monumental Axis in Brazil, the world's widest road? 160.
  317. Howard Hughes insisted on storing his urine in large glass bottles in a garage near his home. He employed an assistant to count and look after them.
  318. Howard Hughes originated the cantilever bra.
  319. Howdy Doody had 48 freckles.
  320. Human adults breathe about 23,000 times a day.
  321. Human beings have been around for only 0.0002 percent of the Earth’s history.
  322. I am is the shortest complete sentence in the English language.
  323. Ice cream was invented in 1620.
  324. Ice hockey pucks travel at speed of up to 100 miles an hour.
  325. Iceland consumes more Coca-Cola per capita than any other nation.
  326. Iceland was the first country to legalize abortion in 1935.
  327. Icelanders read more books per capita than any other people in the world.
  328. If a cow has twins, a bull and a heifer, the heifer will never be able to reproduce.
  329. If a human hair were the thickness of nylon rope, it could support a train engine.
  330. If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle; if the horse has one leg front leg in the air, the person died as a result of wounds received in battle; if the horse has all 4 legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.
  331. If a woman commits adultery in the Tupuri tribe of Africa, she is forced to wear a brass ring round her neck for the rest of her life.
  332. If the population of China walked past you in single file, the line would never end because of the rate of reproduction.
  333. If they all lived, two ordinary house flies could produce 5,000,000,000,000 offspring in one season.
  334. If you add together all the numbers on a roulette wheel (1 to 36) the total is the mystical number 666.
  335. If you are afraid that you might die laughing--you are suffering from cherophobia.
  336. If you ask someone to think of a card, the most common answer is the four of spades.
  337. If you ate too many carrots you would turn orange.
  338. If you can see a rainbow you must have your back to the sun.
  339. If you have three quarters, four dimes, and four pennies, you have $1.19. You also have the largest amount of money in coins without being able to make change for a dollar.
  340. If you put a raisin in a glass of champagne, it will keep floating to the top and sinking to the bottom.
  341. If you translate them literally, the Chinese term kung fu means leisure time.
  342. In 10 minutes, a hurricane releases more energy than all the world's nuclear weapons combined.
  343. In 1221 Genghis Khan killed 1,748,000 people at Nishapur in one hour.
  344. In 1400 B.C. it was the fashion among rich Egyptian women to place a large cone of scented grease on top of their heads and keep it there all day. As the day wore on, the grease melted and dripped down over their bodies, covering their skin with an oily, glistening sheen and bathing their clothes in fragrance.
  345. In 1500 B.C. in Egypt a shaved head was considered the ultimate in feminine beauty. Egyptian women removed every hair from their heads with special gold tweezers and polished their scalps to a high sheen with buffing cloths.
  346. In 1778, fashionable women of Paris never went out in blustery weather without a lightning rod attached to their hats.
  347. In 1800 on 50 cities on earth had a population of more than 100,000.
  348. In 1845 Boston had an ordinance banning bathing unless you had a doctor's prescription.
  349. In 18th century England, women's wigs were sometimes 4 feet high. They were dusted with flour and decorated with stuffed birds, replicas of gardens, plates of fruit or even model ships. Sometimes they were so elaborate, they were worn continuously for several months. They were matted with lard to keep them from coming apart, which made mice and insects a hazard. The fad died suddenly when a hair-powder tax made their upkeep too expensive.
  350. In 1924, an eighteen-foot-high candle weighing three tons was erected in honor of the singer, Enrico Caruso, in Naples.
  351. In 1935, Jesse Owens set six track and field world records in less than one hour.
  352. In 1956, the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay went to The Red Balloon which contained no dialogue.
  353. In 1963, baseball pitcher Gaylord Perry remarked, They'll put a man on the moon before I hit a home run. On July 20, 1969, a few hours after Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon, Gaylord Perry hit his first, and only, home run.
  354. In 1968, a convention of beggars in Dacca, India, passed a resolution demanding that the minimum amount of alms be fixed at 15 paisa (three cents). The convention also demanded that the interval between when a person hears a knock at his front door and when he offers alms should not exceed 45 seconds.
  355. In 1972, a Swedish man balanced on one foot for over five hours, using nothing for support.
  356. In 1973 two blind Peruvian soccer teams played a match using a ball filled with dried peas.
  357. In 1976 a South American guppy became the first fish in space.
  358. In 1976, a Los Angeles secretary named Jannene Swift officially married a 50-pound rock. The ceremony was witnessed by more than 20 people.
  359. In a normal lifetime an American will eat 200 pounds of peanuts and 10,000 pounds of meat.
  360. In a sex study 45 percent of American men said they prefer to make love with the light on--which is unfortunate, because only 17 percent of American women prefer it that way.
  361. In Albania nodding the head means no and shaking the head means yes.
  362. In ancient Boustrophedon writing every alternate line in the text reads from right to left.
  363. In ancient China and certain parts of India, mouse meat was considered a great delicacy.
  364. In ancient Greece, where the mouse was sacred to Apollo, mice were sometimes devoured by temple priests.
  365. In ancient Greece, women counted their age from the date on which they were married, not from the day they were born.
  366. In Atlanta, Georgia, it is illegal to tie a giraffe to a telephone pole or street lamp.
  367. In Brazil, at the Maracaña Stadium, a moat had to be built around the playing field to keep fans from assaulting the players and referees.
  368. In Bristol, England, there is a law stating that a dog (but not a cat) has the right to observe sexual activities and can't be kicked out of bed just for getting in the way.
  369. In Brooklyn, N.Y., it's illegal to let a dog sleep in your bathtub.
  370. In Calama, a town in the Atacama Desert of Chile, it has never rained.
  371. In deep space most lubricants will disappear.
  372. In early eighteenth-century Portugal, the Church owned two-thirds of all the land.
  373. In Egypt, in 1500 B.C., a shaved head was considered the ultimate in feminine beauty. Their women removed every hair from their heads with special gold tweezers and polished their scalps to a high sheen with buffing cloths.
  374. In eighteenth-century English gambling dens, there was an employee whose only job was to swallow the dice if there was a police raid.
  375. In Elizabethan England the spoon was such a novelty, such a prized rarity, that people carried their own folding spoons to banquets.
  376. In Elizabethan slang, the term to die meant to have an orgasm.
  377. In English pubs, ale is ordered by pints and quarts. So in old England, when customers got unruly, the bartender would yell at them to mind their own pints and quarts and settle down. It's where we get the phrase mind your Ps and Qs.
  378. In every episode of Seinfeld there is a Superman somewhere.
  379. In Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift described the two moons of Mars, Phobos and Deimos, giving their exact size and speeds of rotation. He did this more than 100 years before either moon was discovered.
  380. In India it costs less to have sex with a prostitute than it does to buy a condom.
  381. In medieval Thailand, they had moveable type printing presses. The type was made from baked oxen dung.
  382. In nearly every language in the world, the word for mother begins with a 'm' sound.
  383. In Papua New Guinea there are villages within five miles of each other that speak different languages.
  384. In regard to estimating a dog's age in human years. The first year of canine life is equal to 21 years of human life (the dog grows to adulthood.) Every additional year is equivalent to four human years.
  385. In Shakespeare's time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes--when you pulled on the ropes the mattress tightened, making the bed firmer to sleep on. That's where the phrase, good night, sleep tight! came from.
  386. In space, astronauts can’t cry because there is no gravity, so the tears can't flow.
  387. In the 10th century, the Grand Vizier of Persia took his entire library with him wherever he went. The 117,000-volume library was carried by camels trained to walk in alphabetical order.
  388. In the '40s, the Bich pen was changed to Bic for fear Americans would pronounce it bitch.
  389. In the Balanta tribe of Africa, a bride remained married until her wedding gown was worn out. If she wanted a divorce after 2 weeks, all she had to do was rip up her dress. This was the custom until about 20 years ago, anyway.
  390. In the Congo, one must be very careful not to utter the name of anyone who is out fishing. Certain Congolese think you put such a whammy on the named native that he won't catch anything but flies.
  391. In the early 19th century the words trousers and pants were considered obscene in England.
  392. In the eighteenth century, many women went to the trouble of having their gums pierced so they could use hooks to secure their false teeth.
  393. In the eleventh century Benedict IX was Pope at eleven years old.
  394. In the four major US professional sports (baseball, basketball, football, and hockey), there are only seven teams whose nicknames do not end with an S.
  395. In the Greek version of Scrabble, the letter worth the most points is omega.
  396. In the marriage ceremony of the ancient Inca Indians of Peru, the couple was considered officially wed when they took off their sandals and handed them to each other.
  397. In the memoirs of Catherine II of Russia, it is recorded that any Russian aristocrat who displeased the queen was forced to squat in the great antechamber of the palace and to remain in that position for several days, mewing like a cat, clucking like a hen, and pecking his food from the floor.
  398. In the Middle English the word minister meant lowly person. It was originally adopted as a term of humility for men of the church.
  399. In the United States, a pound of potato chips cost two hundred times more than a pound of potatoes.
  400. In the vast majority of the world's languages, the word for mother begins with the letter m.
  401. In Wales, sheep outnumber people by two to one.
  402. In Wilton, Maine, there is a cannery that imports and cans only dandelion greens.
  403. India has 50 million monkeys.
  404. Intelligent people have more zinc and copper in their hair.
  405. Isaac Newton's only recorded utterance while he was a member of Parliament was a request to open the window.
  406. It Constitution was stored in various cities until 1952, when it was placed in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C. During the daytime, pages one and four of the document are displayed in a bullet-proof case. The case contains helium and water vapor to preserve the paper's quality. At night, the pages are lowered into a vault, behind five-ton doors that are designed to withstand a nuclear explosion. The entire Constitution is displayed only one day a year, September 17, the anniversary of the day the framers signed the document.
  407. It costs more to buy a new car today in the United States than it cost Christopher Columbus to equip and undertake three voyages to and from the New World.
  408. It is a Hindu custom not to cut a child's fingernails before they are a year old.
  409. It is believed that Shakespeare was 46 around the time that the King James Version of the Bible was written. In Psalms 46, the 46th word from the first word is shake and the 46th word from the last word is spear.
  410. It is estimated that there are nearly half a million sauna baths in Finland.
  411. It is impossible to sneeze and keep one's eyes open at the same time.
  412. It is possible for any American citizen to give whatever name he or she chooses to any unnamed mountain or hill in the United States.
  413. It is possible to extract aspirin from the bark of trees.
  414. It is possible to lead a cow upstairs but not downstairs.
  415. It is the larvae of moths that can damage cloths, not the moths themselves.
  416. It is widely held that hair on a corpse continues to grow. This macabre belief might be due to the fact that some tissue shrinkage occurs when one dies. The hair only appears to have grown, because the skin around each hair has receded somewhat.
  417. It takes 3,000 cows to supply the NFL with enough leather for a year's supply of footballs.
  418. It takes 4,000 crocuses to produce a single ounce of saffron.
  419. It takes 60 seconds for blood to make one complete circuit of the human body.
  420. It takes a fall of about eight building stories to kill a cat. A fall of three stories will typically break their jaw (due to a floating collar bone), but it takes a fall of five or six stories to break a leg.
  421. It takes a ton of water to make a pound of refined sugar.
  422. It takes the typical person seven minutes to fall asleep.
  423. It takes the Where's Waldo artist one month to complete a drawing.
  424. It was not Delilah that cut off Samson's hair. First his head was shaved, not clipped. Delilah made Samson sleep upon her knees; and she called for a man, and she caused him to shave off the seven locks of his head... No coincidence that there were seven locks either. The same as the Seven Deadly Sins.
  425. It was the accepted practice in babylon 4,000 years ago that for amonth after the wedding, the bride's father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer, and because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the honey month or what we know today as the honeymoon.
  426. It would require an average of 18 hummingbirds to tip the scale at 1 ounce.
  427. It would take 27,000 spiders, each spinning a single web, to produce a pound of web.
  428. It's against the law for dogs to chase or even worry squirrels on the grounds of the state capitol in Raleigh, North Carolina.
  429. It's rumored that sucking on a copper penny will cause a breathalyzer to read 0.
  430. Jack is the most common name in nursery rhymes.
  431. Japan is the largest exporter of frog's legs.
  432. Jaws is the most common name for a goldfish.
  433. Jeanne Pierre Francois Blanchard built the first parachute and tested it using a dog.
  434. Jerry Seinfeld's apartment number (on the show) is 5A. In the old episodes it was 3A.
  435. Jimmy Carter was the first U.S. president to have been born in a hospital.
  436. Johanna Sebastian Bach wrote an operetta about coffee.
  437. John Hughes wrote the screenplay for Weird Science in just two days.
  438. John Larroquette of Night Court was the narrator of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.
  439. John Wilkes Booth's brother once saved the life of Abraham Lincoln's son.
  440. Josephine Clofullia was the most famous bearded lady of all time and a prominent attraction in PT Barnum's sideshow in the 19th century. She modeled her beard after Napoleon III. (She may have suffered from a medical condition called naevus pilosus, where enormous moles or birthmarks form with great amounts of hair growing out of them.)
  441. Jousting is the state sport of Maryland.
  442. Julius Caesar was self-conscious about his receding hairline, hence the laurel wreath he wore.
  443. Julius Epstein won an Oscar for co-writing Casablanca in 1942, and 31 years later won another Oscar for Reuben, Reuben.
  444. Kemo Sabe means soggy shrub in Navajo.
  445. Kermit the Frog has 11 points on his collar around his neck.
  446. Kermit the Frog is left-handed.
  447. Kidney stones come in any color--from yellow to brown.
  448. King Camp Gillette invented the first disposable safety razor. Two years after he first patented his invention, he had only sold 168 blades. By the following year, sales jumped to an incredible 12.4 million blades.
  449. King Henry III of France, Louis XVI of France and Napoleon all suffered from ailurophobia--fear of cats.
  450. King Louis XI of France once commanded one of his abbots to invent a new and ridiculous musical instrument for the amusement of the Court. The abbot gathered together a series of pigs, each with their own distinctive squeal, and proceeded to prick each one of them in turn to provide the desired tune.
  451. Koalas never drink water. They get fluids from the eucalyptus leaves they eat.
  452. Lacrosse is the official national game of Canada, not hockey.
  453. Lanugo is the soft woolly hair that covers the human fetus, and that of other mammals, during development. It is shed and virtually disappears at birth.
  454. Lee Harvey Oswald was booked with mugshot number 54018.
  455. LEGO comes from the Danish, LEg GOdt, which means play well.
  456. Leonardo da Vinci could draw with one hand and write with the other--at the same time.
  457. Leonardo da Vinci invented an alarm clock that woke the sleeper by gently rubbing their feet.
  458. Leonardo da Vinci spent twelve years painting the Mona Lisa's lips.
  459. Levan, Utah is navel spelled backwards. It is so named because it is in the middle of Utah.
  460. Levi's 501 jeans got their number from their original stock number in the first Levi's store.
  461. Lewis Carrol wrote his books while standing up.
  462. Lewis Carroll wrote 98,721 letters in the last thirty-seven years of his life.
  463. Lobsters are scared of octopuses. The sight of one makes a lobster freeze.
  464. Louis the XIV had fourteen personal wigmakers and 1,000 wigs.
  465. Louis XIV insisted that none of his courtiers sit in chairs with arms.
  466. Louis XIV of France once had an unfortunate experience while putting on a sock--his toe fell off.
  467. Magnetic ants are so-named because they always build their nests pointing north and south.
  468. Mailing an entire building has been illegal in the U.S. since 1916 when a man mailed a 40,000-ton brick house across Utah to avoid high freight rates.
  469. Maine is the only state in the United States whose name is just one syllable.
  470. Maine is the toothpick capital of the world.
  471. Male bees will try to attract sex partners with orchid fragrance.
  472. Hammerfest in Norway is the most northerly town in the world.
  473. Man is the only animal that cries.
  474. Many hamsters blink one eye at a time.
  475. Many years ago in England, pub frequenters had a whistle baked into the rim or handle of their ceramic cups. When they needed a refill, they used the whistle to get some service. Wet your whistle, is the phrase inspired by this practice.
  476. Marie Curie, the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who discovered radium died as a result of over-exposure to radioactivity.
  477. Marie de Medici, a member of that famous Italian family and a 17th-century queen of France, had expensive tastes in clothes. One special dress was outfitted with 39,000 tiny pearls and 3,000 diamonds, and cost the equivalent of twenty million dollars at the time it was made in 1606. She wore it once.
  478. Mary Magdalene is the patroness of hairdressers.
  479. Members of the Chenchu tribe in India believe that if you conceive a child at night it will be born blind.
  480. Men can read smaller print than women; women can hear better.
  481. Men have more blood than women. Men have 1.5 gallons versus .875 gallons for women.
  482. Men laugh longer, more loudly, and more often than women.
  483. Men spent about 106 days out of their lives shaving.
  484. Mexico once had three different Presidents in the space of 24 hours.
  485. Milk from young coconuts was successfully used as blood plasma during World War II.
  486. Mistletoe is a parasite. It wraps itself around certain trees to extract the sap from them. On the other hand, mistletoe, an evergreen, can also help its host by supplying it with chlorophyll in winter when the host plant has lost its leaves.
  487. More American workers (18%) call sick on Friday than any other day of the week. Tuesday has the lowest percent of absenteeism (11%).
  488. More Americans have died in automobile accidents than have died in all the wars ever fought by the United States.
  489. More Mohicans wore Mohawks than the Mohawks did.
  490. More people are allergic to cow's milk than any other food.
  491. More people are killed annually by donkeys than in airplane crashes.
  492. More people go to the laundromat on Sunday than go to church.
  493. More steel in the US is used to make bottle caps than to manufacture automobile bodies.
  494. More than 14 million Bic pens are sold daily in 150 countries. Bic is actually a shortened version of founder Marcel Bich's name.
  495. More than 2 billion pencils are used in the United States every year.
  496. Mosquitoes are attracted to the color blue twice as much as to any other color.
  497. Mosquitoes have 47 teeth.
  498. Most cows give more milk when they listen to music.
  499. Most elephants weigh less than the tongue of the blue whale.
  500. Most lipstick contains fish scales.
  501. Most mammals are color-blind.
  502. Most pencils sold in Europe don't have erasers.
  503. Most toilets flush in E flat.
  504. Most tropical marine fish could survive in a tank filled with human blood.
  505. Mozart wrote the music for the song Twinkle Twinkle, Little Star, when he was only five years old.
  506. Mr. P. J. Tierney, father of the modern diner, died of indigestion in 1917 after eating at a diner.
  507. Napoleon made his battle plans in a sandbox.
  508. Napoleon was terrified of cats.
  509. Naturalists use marshmallows to lure alligators out of swamps.
  510. Nearly a quarter of all the bones in the human body can be found in the feet.
  511. Nearly a quarter of the population of Poland was killed in the Second World War.
  512. Neil Armstrong stepped on the moon with his left foot first.
  513. New Jersey has a spoon museum with over 5,400 spoons from almost all the states.
  514. Nice is derived from the Latin nescius, ignorant (from nescire, not to know.) Its meaning in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries commonly was foolish or wanton.
  515. Ninety percent of all species that have become extinct have been birds.
  516. No matter its size or thickness, no piece of paper can be folded in half more than 7 times.
  517. No NFL team that plays its home games in a domed stadium ever won a Superbowl—until the St. Louis Rams in 2000.
  518. Nobody won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1972.
  519. Nondairy creamer is flammable.
  520. Nose hair serves the same purpose as the air filter in your car.
  521. Nose prints are the most reliable way to identify dogs.
  522. Not one new livestock animal has been domesticated in the last 4,000 years.
  523. Nowhere in the Bible does it mention that Jesus was ever a carpenter as most people think. Although Matthew 13:55 states that he was a carpenter's son, and Mark 6:3 tells that people called him a carpenter, there is no other reference in the Bible indicating the occupation of Jesus.
  524. Nutmeg is extremely poisonous if injected intravenously.
  525. Of the 156 women college presidents in the United States in 1979, 105 were nuns.
  526. Of the typographical errors in the Constitution, the misspelling of the word Pensylvania above the signers' names is probably the most glaring.
  527. Ohio is listed as the 17th state in the U.S., but technically it is Number 47. Until August 7, 1953, Congress forgot to vote on a resolution to admit Ohio to the Union.
  528. On an average work day, a typist's fingers travel 12.6 miles.
  529. On an island in northern Wales there's a village called Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllandysiliogogogoch.
  530. On average, 100 people choke to death on ball-point pens every year.
  531. On average, a 4-year-old child asks 437 questions a day.
  532. On the average, a normal person's eye muscles move about 100,000 to 150,000 times in one day.
  533. On the new $100 bill the time on the clock tower of Independence Hall is 4:10.
  534. One has to wonder why the day when Jesus died is called Good Friday. In its earlier, archaic meaning, the word good was synonymous with holy and was often used as a euphemism for God.
  535. One hundred and twenty drops of water are needed to fill a teaspoon.
  536. One in every four Americans has appeared on television.
  537. One of the most efficient ways of cleaning your teeth is to chew on a stick.
  538. One of the reasons marijuana is illegal today because cotton growers in the ‘30s lobbied against hemp farmers--they saw it as competition.
  539. One out of two Americans live within 50 miles of where they grew up.
  540. One year, Elvis Presley once paid 91% of his annual income to the IRS.
  541. One-fourth of the world's population lives on less than $200 a year. Ninety million people survive on less than $75 a year.
  542. Only one person in two billion will live to be 116 or older.
  543. Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4th. The last signature wasn't added until 5 years later.
  544. Ostrich racing is a popular sport in South Africa.
  545. Over 20 million Africans were transported to America and the Caribbean during the 300 years of the slave trade.
  546. Over 400 films have been made based on the plays of Shakespeare.
  547. Paper was invented early in the second century by a Chinese eunuch.
  548. Patrick Henry was elected as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention, but declined, because he smelt a rat.
  549. Peanuts are one of the ingredients of dynamite.
  550. Peladophobia: fear of becoming bald.
  551. Penguins are the only bird that can leap into the air like porpoises.
  552. Penny Marshall was the first woman director to have a film take in more than $100 million at the box office--the film was 1988’s Big.
  553. People living in mountain states eat 30% more cookies than other people.
  554. People used to wear shoes on either foot.
  555. People who have never been married are seven and a half times more likely than married people to be admitted to a psychiatric facility.
  556. Pepsi was originally named Brad's Drink, and Kool-Aid originally went by Fruit Smack Flavored Syrup.
  557. Percentage of Africa that is wilderness--28%. Percentage of North America that is wilderness--38%.
  558. Percentage of American men who say they would marry the same woman if they had it to do all over again: 80%. Percentage of American women who say they'd marry the same man: 50%.
  559. Percentage of Americans who have visited Disneyland or Disney World: 70.
  560. Pi has been calculated to 2,260,321,363 digits. The billionth digit in Pi is 9.
  561. Pigs can cover a mile in 7.5 minutes when running at top speed.
  562. Ping-Pong is a registered trademark of Parker Brothers.
  563. Pinocchio is Italian for pine eyes.
  564. Pinocchio was made of pine.
  565. Planet Jupiter is the only planet to spin clockwise.
  566. Plastic lawn flamingos outnumber real flamingos in the U.S.A.
  567. Playing cards in India are round.
  568. Pogonophobia: fear of beards.
  569. Popeye was 5’6 tall.
  570. Pound for pound, earthworms make up half of all animal life.
  571. Prior to 1900, prize fights lasted up to 100 rounds.
  572. Prize fights prior to the turn of the century were fought bare knuckled, and often lasted up to more than a hundred rounds.
  573. Queen bees can lay three thousand eggs in one day.
  574. Racehorses have been known to wear out new shoes in one race.
  575. Rain contains vitamin B12.
  576. Rather than kiss, Samians simply smell each other.
  577. Rhinoceros horn, which is much in demand for medicinal purposes is not horn at all, but the animal's hair.
  578. Rhythms and syzygy are the longest English words without vowels.
  579. Rice is the chief food for half the people in the world.
  580. Rin Tin Tin, was voted the most popular film performer of 1926.
  581. Roman Emperor Caligula made his horse a senator.
  582. Roses cut in the afternoon last longer than ones cut in the morning.
  583. Rubber is an important ingredient on the manufacture of bubble-gum.
  584. Rudyard Kipling only used black ink.
  585. Russia has the most movie theaters in the world.
  586. Scientists insist that no dog has ever been bored.
  587. Scotland exports sand to Saudi Arabia.
  588. Sean Connery once worked as a coffin-polisher.
  589. Seventy-five percent of the inhabitants of Norway live within 10 miles of the sea.
  590. Shakespeare was the first to use certain words that are now common, including hurry, bump, eyeball and anchovy.
  591. Sheep prefer to drink running water.
  592. Ships can travel faster in cold water than warm.
  593. Sideburns were named after General Ambrose Everett Burnside—inventor of the breech-loading rifle.
  594. Sidewinder snakes move in their peculiar fashion to avoid putting too much of their body area on the hot desert sand.
  595. Sigmund Freud had a morbid fear of ferns.
  596. Singapore has 299,000 people per square kilometer.
  597. Singapore means City of Lions, but none have ever been seen there.
  598. Singapore only has one train station.
  599. Sir Isaac Newton, who invented Calculus, had trouble with names to the point where he would forget his brothers' names.
  600. Sir William Backstone wrote perhaps the most influential book ever on English law, yet never practiced law himself.
  601. Sir Winston Churchill was a prisoner-of-war during the Boar War.
  602. Slugs have 4 noses.
  603. Snails have teeth. They are arranged in rows along the snail's tongue and are used like a file to saw or slice through the snail's food.
  604. Soldiers arrived to fight the Battle of Marne in World War I not on foot or by military airplane or military vehicle--but by taxi cabs. France took over all the taxi cabs in Paris to get soldiers to the front.
  605. Some 160,000 people attempt suicide every year in France.
  606. Some apes in the wild have been observed whistling.
  607. Some Kenyans live inside the trunks of the baobab tree.
  608. Some toothpastes contain antifreeze.
  609. Sri Lanka is the second largest tea-producer in the world.
  610. State with the highest percentage of people who walk to work: Alaska.
  611. Stevie Wonder endorses all contracts with his fingerprint.
  612. Stewardesses is the longest word that is typed with only the left hand.
  613. Swimming pools in Phoenix, Arizona, pick up 20 pounds of dust a year.
  614. T.E. Lawrence, know as Lawence of Arabia, used a fleet of Rolls Royces to transport his unit when he led British forces against the Turks in Syria.
  615. Tabasco sauce is made by fermenting vinegar and hot peppers in a French oak barrel which has three inches of salt on top and is aged for three years until all the salt is diffused through the barrel.
  616. Talmudists believe Adam and Eve resided in paradise a mere 12 hours before they were kicked out.
  617. Ten percent of the Russian government's income comes from the sale of vodka.
  618. Ten tons of space dust falls on the Earth every day.
  619. Tens of thousands of Ugandans reported that they had seen and heard a talking tortoise in 1978.
  620. The 12th president of the United States was David Rice Atchinson, a Missouri senator who served for one day in 1849.
  621. The 3 most valuable brand names on earth: Marlboro, Coca-Cola and Budweiser, in that order.
  622. The Academy Award statue is named after a librarian's uncle. One day Margaret Herrick, librarian for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, remarked that the statue looked like her Uncle Oscar--the name stuck.
  623. The act of snapping one's fingers has a name. It is called a fillip.
  624. The actor Stewart Granger, changed his name because didn't like his real name. James Stewart.
  625. The airplane Buddy Holly died in was the American Pie.
  626. The Amazon river pushes so much water into the Atlantic that, more than 100 miles at sea, off the mouth of the river, one can dip fresh water out of the ocean and drink it.
  627. The American poet Emily Dickinson used to talk to visitors from a adjoining room, because she was so self-conscious about her appearance.
  628. The amount American Airlines saved in 1987 by eliminating one olive from each salad served in first class: $40,000.
  629. The ampersand (&) was once a letter of the English alphabet.
  630. The Ancient Romans used to toast a woman's health by drinking a glass of wine for every letter of her name.
  631. The animal that can last the longest without drinking water is the rat.
  632. The Arctic tern flies to the Antarctic and back every year.
  633. The are 255 squares on a Scrabble board.
  634. The average American consumes 1,500 pounds of food each year.
  635. The average American consumes enough caffeine in one year to kill a horse.
  636. The average American eats 114,000 Tootsie Rolls in their lifetime.
  637. The average American eats two donuts a day.
  638. The average bed is home to over 6 billion dust mites.
  639. The average desktop computer contains 5-10 times more computing power than was used to land a man on the moon.
  640. The average garden-variety caterpillar has 248 muscles in its head.
  641. The average human body contains enough carbon to make 900 pencils.
  642. The average human produces 10,000 gallons of saliva in a lifetime.
  643. The average man will spent about 145 days of this life shaving.
  644. The average pencil can write 45,000 words.
  645. The average person can live 11 days without water.
  646. The average person loses about 25-125 hairs a day.
  647. The average person's total skin covering would weigh about 6 pounds if collected into one mass.
  648. The average speed of Heinz ketchup leaving the bottle is 25 miles per year.
  649. The average U.S. high school graduate has a vocabulary of about 60,000 words.
  650. The avocado has the most calories of any fruit.
  651. The Aztec and Maya Indians played a complicated game not unlike lacrosse. When the game was finished, the captain of the losing team was slaughtered before the onlookers and his body was torn limb from limb.
  652. The bat is the only mammal that can fly.
  653. The bloodhound is the only animal whose evidence is admissible in an American court.
  654. The blueprints for the Eiffel Tower covered more than 14,000 square feet of drafting paper.
  655. The book of Solomon in the Bible was written long after he died.
  656. The brain of Neanderthal man was larger than that of modern man.
  657. The bubbles in Guiness Beer sink to the bottom rather than float to the top like all other beers. No one knows why.
  658. The bulls-eye on a dartboard must be 5 feet 8 inches off the ground.
  659. The car in the foreground on the back of a $10 bill is a 1925 Huptmobile.
  660. The cashew nut is a member of the poison ivy family.
  661. The caterpillar has more than 2,000 muscles.
  662. The ceremony to marry an Amish couple traditionally takes about 3 hours 30 minutes.
  663. The characters Bert and Ernie on Sesame Street were named after Bert the cop and Ernie the taxi driver in Frank Capra's Its A Wonderful Life.
  664. The chief of police in Wingate, North Carolina, is required by law to execute any dog he finds running in heat if he can't find the owner in four days.
  665. The chow is the only dog with a black tongue.
  666. The CIA, desperate to undermine Fidel Castro’s popularity, once planned to put hair-remover inside his shoes during an oversea trip so his famous beard would fall out.
  667. The colder the room you sleep in, the better the chances are that you'll have a bad dream.
  668. The color purple was a sign of great rank in Ancient Rome.
  669. The correct response to the Irish greeting, Top of the morning to you, is and the rest of the day to yourself.
  670. The cruise liner, Queen Elizabeth II, moves only six inches for each gallon of diesel that it burns.
  671. The dial tone of a normal telephone is in the key of F.
  672. The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem is one of the few shrines in the world simultaneously sacred to three religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam.
  673. The dome on Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home, conceals a billiards room. In Jefferson's day, billiards were illegal in Virginia.
  674. The door to 10 Downing Street, home of Britian’s Prime Minister, only opens from the inside.
  675. The doorbell was invented in 1831.
  676. The dot on top of the letter i is called a tittle. Tittle is Latin for something very small.
  677. The dumbest domesticated animal is the turkey.
  678. The dunce cap of schoolhouse fame originates from a paper cone that was placed on the heads of accused witches during the Middle Ages. When Joan of Arc was martyred, she was wearing one of them.
  679. The durian fruit is a Asian delicacy. Unfortunately, it smells like the flesh of rotting corpses.
  680. The earliest known legal text was written by Ur Nammu in 2100 B.C.
  681. The early Greeks experimented with the direction of their writing, going from right to left and left to right alternately, before adopting what is now the standard Western practice.
  682. The Earth is the densest plant in our solar system.
  683. The Earth weighs 6,600 billion billion tons.
  684. The Eiffel Tower has 1792 steps.
  685. The Eiffel Tower has 2,500,000 rivets in it.
  686. The Eisenhower interstate system requires that one mile in every five must be straight. These straight sections are useable as airstrips in times of war or other emergencies.
  687. The electric chair was invented by a dentist.
  688. The electric shaver was patented on November 6, 1928.
  689. The embryos of tiger sharks fight each other while in their mother's womb, the survivor being the baby shark that is born.
  690. The expression dog days goes back to the Romans, who believed that in the hottest part of the summer, Sirius (the dog star and the brightest star in the constellation) lent its own heat to the heat of the sun. The Roman dog days lasted from July 3 to August 11.
  691. The expression tit for tat comes from dit vor dat which means this for that in Dutch.
  692. The fastest growing nail is on the middle finger.
  693. The fastest of all fish in the sea is the swordfish, streaming forward at speeds near 68 miles per hour.
  694. The female angler-fish weights up to half a ton. The male, however, is only a few millimeters long, and spends his whole life attached to her nose.
  695. The female ants are ones that do all the work.
  696. The fingerprints of koala bears are virtually indistinguishable from those of humans, so much so that they could be confused at a crime scene.
  697. The first automobile race ever seen in the United States was held in Chicago in 1895. The track ran from Chicago to Evanston, Illinois. The winner was J. Frank Duryea, whose average speed was 7 miles per hour.
  698. The first book of crosswords was introduced on April 10, 1924 for a steep $1.35 per book and each one came with a freshly sharpened pencil.
  699. The first car with air-conditioning was the Packard.
  700. The first competition in the world's first Olympic games, 776 B.C., was a foot race. The participants were all males, and ran in the nude.
  701. The first couple to be shown in bed together on prime time television was Fred and Wilma Flintstone.
  702. The first crime mentioned in the first episode of Hill Street Blues was armed robbery.
  703. The first episode of Leave it to Beaver aired on October 4, 1957.
  704. The first flushing toilet seen on TV was on Leave it to Beaver.
  705. The first footprints at Grauman's Chinese Theater (now Mann's), were made by Norma Talmadge in 1927. Legend has it that she accidentally stepped in wet concrete outside the building. Since then, over 180 stars have been immortalized, along with their hands and feet and even noses (Jimmy Durante).
  706. The first letter Vanna White ever turned on Wheel of Fortune was the letter T.
  707. The first Lifesaver flavor was peppermint.
  708. The first man to be convicted on finger print evidence was Harry Jackson in 1902.
  709. The first message tapped by Samuel Morse over his invention the telegraph was: What hath God wrought?
  710. The first non-human to win an Oscar was Mickey Mouse.
  711. The first place in the western world to give women the right to vote was an island known as Man.
  712. The first plastic ever invented was celluloid, it came about as an alternative for billiard balls made from Ivory.
  713. The first time movie audiences were treated to a flushing toilet was in Alfred Hitchcock's 1959 release Psycho.
  714. The first toilet ever seen on television was on Leave It To Beaver.
  715. The first typewriter was built by William Burt in 1829 and was intended to be used for the blind.
  716. The first victim of the electric chair took eight minutes to die.
  717. The first word played in the Scrabble rules demonstration game is horn.
  718. The first word spoken by an ape in the movie Planet of the Apes was smile.
  719. The first word spoken on the moon was okay.
  720. The first words spoken by over Alexander Bell over the telephone were: Watson, please come here. I want you.
  721. The first words spoken by Thomas Edison over the phonograph were: Mary had a little lamb.
  722. The first xerographic copy (prelude to photocopy) was 10.22.38 Astoria.
  723. The first zoo in the USA was in Philadelphia.
  724. The five favorite U.S. school lunches nationwide, according to the American School Food Service Association, are, in order, pizza, chicken nuggets, tacos, burritos and hamburgers.
  725. The flea can jump 350 times its body length. That's the equivalent of a human jumping the length of a football field.
  726. The foot is the most common body part bitten by insects.
  727. The force of 1 billion people jumping at the same time is equal to 500 tons of TNT.
  728. The formula for cold cream has hardly changed at all in the 1,700 years since it was originally made by the Roman physician Galen.
  729. The fortune cookie was invented in 1916 by George Jung, a Los Angeles noodlemaker.
  730. The French national anthem, La Marseillaise, derived its title from the enthusiasm of the men of Marseilles, France, who sang it when they marched into Paris at the outset of the French Revolution. Rouget de l'Isle, its composer, was an artillery officer. According to his account, he fell asleep at a harpsichord and dreamt the words and the music. Upon waking, he remembered the entire piece from his dream and immediately wrote it down.
  731. The game of tennis originated in the French monasteries of the 11th century.
  732. The giant crab of Japan can be as large as 12 feet across.
  733. The giraffe has the highest blood pressure of any animal.
  734. The gorilla's scientific name is Gorilla gorilla gorilla.
  735. The great European cathedrals were so solidly built that there is sometimes as much stone below ground as there is above it.
  736. The Great Pyramid of Cheops was originally designed with windows.
  737. The greater dwarf lemur in Madagascar always gives birth to triplets.
  738. The Greeks in the time of Alexander liked blonde hair. Men and women alike bleached their hair with potash water and herbs, creating a reddish-blond color.
  739. The green stuff on the occasional freak potato chip is chlorophyll.
  740. The greyhound can reach speeds of up to 41.7 miles per hour.
  741. The Guinness Book of Records holds the record for being the book most often stolen from British public libraries.
  742. The Gulf Stream could carry a message in a bottle at an average of 4 miles per hour.
  743. The hair of an adult can stretch 25 percent of its length without breaking. If it is less elastic, it is not healthy.
  744. The hardest bone in the human body is the jawbone.
  745. The Hawaiian alphabet has 12 letters
  746. The Hershey Foods Corporation can produce 30 three million Hershey's Kisses in one day of production.
  747. The highest point in Pennsylvania is lower than the lowest point in Colorado.
  748. The highest scoring word in the English language game of Scrabble is Quartzy.
  749. The housefly hums in the middle octave, key of F.
  750. The human body is better suited to two four-hour sleep cycles than one eight-hour one.
  751. The human body weighs 40 times more than the brain.
  752. The human stomach can only hold about five pints.
  753. The human tongue tastes bitter things with the taste buds toward the back. Salty and pungent flavors are tasted in the middle of the tongue, sweet flavors at the tip.
  754. The hundred billionth Crayola crayon was Perriwinkle Blue.
  755. The Icelandic Parliament is the oldest surviving parliament in the world. It was founded in A.D. 930.
  756. The image of the king used in most standard decks of playing cards is said to have been based on Charles I, the English monarch who was beheaded in 1649.
  757. The Incas and the Aztecs were able to function without the wheel.
  758. The Indian atlas-moth has a 12-inch wing span.
  759. The infinity symbol is called a lemniscate.
  760. The inventor of the flushing toilet was Thomas Crapper.
  761. The IRS would need at least 15 3/4 miles of shelves to store the tax forms they receive each year.
  762. The Japanese, Santa Claus is a woman.
  763. The Jews and the early Christians started the day at sunset. Christmas Eve means, accordingly, the first part of Christmas Day, and it was only later that it came to be considered as the evening before Christmas. The same goes for New Year's Eve.
  764. The keyboard we use, developed in 1867, began with keys in alphabetical order. It was modified to prevent the jamming of keys, and evolved into the configuration we use today. Better ways of placing the alphabet have been developed, but no one can sell them.
  765. The language of Taki, spoken in parts of French Guinea, consists of only 340 words.
  766. The largest cabbage weighed 144 pounds.
  767. The largest crabs in the world, weighing more than 28 lbs., are found off the coast of Japan.
  768. The largest known kidney stone weighed 1.36 kilograms.
  769. The largest pumpkin weighed 377 pounds.
  770. The largest stained-glass window in the world is at Kennedy International Airport in New York City. It can be seen on the American Airlines terminal building and measures 300 feet long by 23 feet high.
  771. The last London smog occurred in 1962.
  772. The left leg of a chicken in more tender than the right one.
  773. The Les Nessman character on the TV series WKRP in Cincinnati wore a Band-Aid in every episode, either on himself, his glasses or his clothing.
  774. The letter b took its present form from a symbol used in Egyptian hieroglyphics to represent a house.
  775. The letter J does not appear anywhere on the periodic table of the elements.
  776. The letter n ends all Japanese words not ending in a vowel.
  777. The letter o is the oldest letter. It has not changed in shape since its adoption in the Phoenician alphabet, circa 1,300 B.C.
  778. The letter w is the only letter in the alphabet that doesn't have one syllable, it has three.
  779. The letters 'J', 'U', and 'W' were not used by the Romans.
  780. The life span of a taste bud is 10 days.
  781. The longest alphabet is Cambodian. It has 74 letters compared with the 26 in English.
  782. The longest English word consisting entirely of consonants (and not includingy as a vowel) is the word crwth which is from the fourteenth century and means crowd.
  783. The longest recorded flight of a chicken is 13 seconds.
  784. The longest time a person has been in a coma is 37 years.
  785. The longest word in the Old Testament is Malhershalahashbaz.
  786. The lyrics for Star Spangled Banner were written by Francis Scott Key, but the tune was actually that of a popular drinking song called Anacrean in Heaven. Anacrean was a Greek poet who was revered as a bard of wine, love, song and revelry. Key's ditty didn't become the official national anthem of the United States until 117 years after he wrote the words for it.
  787. The magician's words hocus-pocus are taken from the name of a mythological sorcerer, Ochus Bochus, who appears in Norse folktales and legends.
  788. The Main Library at Indiana University sinks over an inch every year because when it was built, engineers failed to take into account the weight of all the books that would occupy the building.
  789. The main library at Indiana University sinks over an inch every year because when it was built, engineers failed to take into account the weight of all the books that would occupy the building.
  790. The major export of Lichtenstien is false teeth.
  791. The McDonalds at the SkyDome in Toronto, Ontario is the only one in the world that sells hot dogs.
  792. The medical term for the condition known as writers' cramp is chirospasm.
  793. The Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary is banned in Carlsbad, New Mexico.
  794. The metal part at the end of a pencil is 20 percent sulfur.
  795. The microwave was invented after a researcher walked by a radar tube and a chocolate bar melted in his pocket.
  796. The migratory locust is kept flying by a bundle of hairs on its head. When these hairs are stimulated by an air current coming from the front, they create a nerve stimulus that keeps the locust's wings beating. The beating, in turn, accelerates the air current. Once the locust takes off, it flies for long distances.
  797. The mongoose was barred live entry into the U.S. in 1902.
  798. The moon is one million times drier than the Gobi Desert.
  799. The moon weighs 81 billion billion tons.
  800. The most common disease in the world is tooth decay.
  801. The most common name in the world is Muhammed.
  802. The most common speed limit sign in the United States is 25 m.p.h.
  803. The most common street name in the U.S. is Second Street.
  804. The most common time for a wake up call is 7 a.m.
  805. The most commonly used word in English conversation is I.
  806. The most fatal car accidents occur on Saturday.
  807. The most sensitive finger on the human hand is the index finger.
  808. The motto of the American people, In God We Trust, was not adopted as the national slogan until 1956.
  809. The mouth produces a quart of saliva a day.
  810. The nail on the thumb grows the slowest.
  811. The name Jeep came from the abbreviation used in the army of the General Purpose vehicle, G.P.
  812. The name Jeep came from the military abbreviation GP, which is short for the army's General Purpose Vehicle.
  813. The name of the Internet's most popular directory, is an acronym. According to the company, the name Yahoo stands for Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle.
  814. The name Wendy was made up for the book Peter Pan.
  815. The names of the two stone lions in front of the New York Public Library are Patience and Fortitude.
  816. The number of possible ways of playing just the first four moves on each side in a chess game is 318,979,564,000.
  817. The nutritional value of squash and pumpkin seeds improves with age. These seeds are among the few
  818. The oldest commercially marketed carbonated drink was Moxie, which became available in apothecaries as a medical tonic in 1876.
  819. The oldest known vegetable is the pea.
  820. The oldest person to sign the Constitution was Benjamin Franklin (81). The youngest was Jonathan Dayton of New Jersey (26).
  821. The oldest word in the English language is town.
  822. The onion is actually a lily.
  823. The only 15-letter word that can be spelled without repeating a letter is uncopyrightable.
  824. The only dog that doesn't have a pink tongue is the chow.
  825. The only domestic animal not mentioned in the Bible is the cat.
  826. The only President to win a Pulitzer Prize: John Kennedy for Profiles in Courage.
  827. The original name for the butterfly was flutterby.
  828. The ostrich has a 46-foot long small intestine.
  829. The Ottoman Empire once had seven emperors in seven months. They died of (in order): burning, choking, drowning, stabbing, heart failure, poisoning and being thrown from a horse.
  830. The outdoor temperature can be estimated to within several degrees by timing the chirps of a cricket. It is done this way: count the number of chirps in a 15-second period, and add 37 to the total. The result will be very close to the actual Fahrenheit temperature. This formula only works in warm weather.
  831. The Owl is the only bird to drop its upper eyelid to wink. All other birds raise their lower eyelids.
  832. The Papacy has a startling sexual history. Pope Sergius III arranged, with the help of his mother, that his bastard should become Pope after him. John VII, deposed in A.D. 963, turned St. John Lateran into a brothel: he was accused of adultery and incest. Leo VIII, who replaced him, died stricken in paralysis in the act of adultery. Benedict IX, elected Pope at the age of ten, grew up in unrestrained license, and shocked the sensibilities even of a dull and barbarous age. Balthasar Cossa, elected Pope to end the Great Schism, later admitted to incest, adultery, and other crimes (two hundred maids, matrons and widows, including a few nuns, fell victims to his brutal lust). In one famous occurrence at the court of Pope Alexander VI, prostitutes were called to dance naked before the assembly, after which prizes were offered to those men who, in the opinion of the spectators, managed to copulate with the most number of prostitutes.
  833. The parachute was invented by Leonardo da Vinci.
  834. The parking meter was invented by C.C. Magee in 1935.
  835. The parking meter was invented in North Dakota.
  836. The percent of men who wash their hands after using a restroom is 55%.
  837. The percent of women who wash their hands after leaving a restroom is 80%.
  838. The pet ferret was domesticated more than 500 years before the house cat.
  839. The phrase a red letter day dates back to 1704, when holy days were marked in red letters in church calendars.
  840. The phrase rule of thumb is derived from an old English law which stated that you couldn't beat your wife with anything wider than your thumb.
  841. The phrase under God was added to the Pledge of Allegiance on June 14, 1954.
  842. The plant life contained in the oceans of the world makes up 85 percent of all our greenery.
  843. The plastic things on the end of shoelaces are called aglets.
  844. The Poison Arrow frog has enough poison to kill 2,200 people.
  845. The Popsicle was invented by eleven-year-old Frank Epperson in 1905. He left a container of soda and a stirrer outside overnight and in the morning discovered them frozen together.
  846. The popular card game bridge was invented in Turkey.
  847. The pound sign # is called anoctothorpe.
  848. The praying mantis is the only insect that can turn its head.
  849. The pretzel is named from the Latin word brachiatus meaning having branch-like arms.
  850. The principality of Monaco consists of 370 acres.
  851. The Puritans forbade the singing of Christmas carols.
  852. The raccoon derives its name from the Indian word meaning he who scratches with his hands.
  853. The reason firehouses have circular stairways is from the days of yore when the engines were pulled by horses. The horses were stabled on the ground floor and figured out how to walk up straight staircases.
  854. The Red Baron, Manfred von Richtofen, Germany's air ace in World War I, was nicknamed by Allied pilots for his plane, a red Albatros fighter—he had 60 confirmed kills. He was shot down, and killed, in France on April 21, 1918.
  855. The red bumps on a turkey's head are called caruncles.
  856. The Romans let their beards grow during mourning, but the Greeks did the opposite.
  857. The Salvation Army's motto is Blood and fire.
  858. The San Francisco cable cars are the only mobile national monuments.
  859. The scorpion fish can merge the shape of its head with the surrounding rocks.
  860. The shell constitutes 12 percent of an egg's weight.
  861. The ship, the Queen Elizabeth 2, should always be written as QE2. QEII is the actual queen.
  862. The shoestring was invented in England in 1790. Prior to this time all shoes were fastened with buckles.
  863. The shortest commercial ever was only 4 frames of a second.
  864. The shortest English word that contains the letters A, B, C, D, E, and F is feedback.
  865. The shortest verse in the Bible consists of two words: Jesus wept. (John 11:35)
  866. The sic command comes from a corruption of the German word such, pronounced sook, which means seek or search. The meaning and pronunciation have been altered over time.
  867. The six official languages of the United Nations are: English, French, Arabic, Chinese, Russian and Spanish.
  868. The size of your foot is approximately the size of your forearm.
  869. The smallest number spelled with an a is one thousand.
  870. The smartest dogs are the Jack Russell Terrier and Scottish Border collie. Dumbest: Afgan hound.
  871. The Soma plant is thought to be sacred in India, and has over 100 hymns dedicated to it.
  872. The sooty tern is on the wing for as long as three years before it returns to its nesting ground.
  873. The specific gravity of your skin and that of Silly Putty is close enough that doctors have actually used Silly Putty to align and test CAT scan machines.
  874. The stall closest to the door in a bathroom is the cleanest, because it is the least used.
  875. The Stanley Cup was donated in 1893 by Canada's then-Governor General, Frederick Arthur, Lord Stanley of Preston. Lord Stanley never saw a Stanley Cup game.
  876. The state of California raises the most turkeys out of all of the states.
  877. The stick insects of Indonesia are the biggest insects in the world, sometimes reaching a foot in length.
  878. The story of Noah's Ark was written earlier than the biblical version--in the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. The Noah of this epic is Utnapishtim, who is supernaturally warned to build a boat in which to survive the deluge. Similarity extends even to the sending out of birds to see if dry land has appeared.
  879. The strongest muscle in the human body is the tongue.
  880. The subject of the first printed book in England was chess.
  881. The telephone's U.S. patent number is 174 465.
  882. The term rookie comes from the military use of the word. It originated during the Civil War, when there was a huge influx of new soldiers, i.e., recruits or reckies.
  883. The term the whole 9 yards came from WW II fighter pilots in the Pacific. When arming their airplanes on the gourd, the .50 caliber machine gun ammo belts measured exactly 27 feet, before being loaded into the fuselage. If the pilots fired all their ammo at a target, it got the whole 9 yards.
  884. The three words in the English language with the letters uu are: vacuum, residuum and continuum.
  885. The Todas, a sect in India, hold in high regard their holy milkman. He must be celibate, and he can never cut his hair. Ordinary customers can only approach him on Mondays and Thursdays.
  886. The typical American consumes 27 pounds of cheese each year.
  887. The typical American eats 263 eggs a year.
  888. The typical hen lays 19 dozen eggs a year.
  889. The typical pencil can draw a line 35 miles long.
  890. The typical person goes to the bathroom 6 times a day.
  891. The U.S. Constitution has 4,400 words. It is the oldest and the shortest written constitution of any government in the world.
  892. The Union ironclad, Monitor, was the first U.S. ship to have a flush toilet.
  893. The vignette on the reverse of the $5 bill depicts the Lincoln Memorial. Engraved on that memorial are the names of the 48 states in 1922, which was the year the memorial was dedicated. There are engravings of 26 state names on the front of the building, which appears on the note vignette. As a result, only 26 of the states appear on the note.
  894. The windiest place on earth is Mt. Washington, in New Hampshire.
  895. The wingspan of a Boeing 747 jet is longer than the Wright Brothers' first flight.
  896. The word bookkeeper is the only word in the English language with three back-to-back double letter combinations.
  897. The word buxom at one time meant obedient.
  898. The word Checkmate in chess comes from the Persian phrase shah mat, which means the king is dead.
  899. The word Diastima is the word for having a gap between your teeth.
  900. The word dreamt is the only word in the English language that ends in mt.
  901. The word dude was coined by Oscar Wilde and his friends. It is a combination of the words duds and attitude.
  902. The word for dog in the Australian aboriginal language Mbabaran happens to be dog.
  903. The word gazelle comes from the Arabian term for affectionate, and is believed to be inspired by the creature's large, gentle eyes.
  904. The word girl appears only once in the Bible.
  905. The word Hallelujah is common to all languages. It is never translated.
  906. The word lethologica describes the state of not being able to remember the word you want.
  907. The word Nazi is actually an abbreviation. The party's full name was the Nazionalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartel.
  908. The word piano is really an abbreviation for the word pianoforte.
  909. The word puppy comes from the French poupee, meaning doll.
  910. The word queue is the only word in the English language that is still pronounced the same way when the last four letters are removed.
  911. The word samba means to rub navels together.
  912. The word terrier comes from the Latin root terra, earth. The Kerry Blue is from County Kerry, Ireland.
  913. The word toast, meaning a proposal of health, originated in Rome, where an actual bit of spiced, burned bread was dropped into wine to improve the drink's flavor, absorb its sediment, and thus make it more healthful.
  914. The words CHOICE COD read the same when held in front of a mirror upside-down.
  915. The words volt and voltage are named for a member of the Italian nobility in the 1700s named Count Voltman.
  916. The world and appears 46,277 times in the Bible.
  917. The world' termites outweight the world's humans 10 to 1.
  918. The world's chickens lay around 400,000,000,000 eggs each year.
  919. The world's first parking meters were installed in Oklahoma in 1935.
  920. The world's record for continuous pogo stick jumping is 41 hours.
  921. The world's youngest parents were 8 and 9 and lived in China in 1910.
  922. The youngest Pope was 11 years old.
  923. There are 12,000 nails in the average three-bedroom family home.
  924. There are 17 steps leading up to Sherlock Holmes’ apartment.
  925. There are 22 stars in the Paramount logo.
  926. There are 293 different ways to make change for a dollar.
  927. There are 333 toilet paper squares on a toilet paper roll.
  928. There are 35 million digestive glands in the stomach.
  929. There are about 100,000 hairs on the human head.
  930. There are about 40 different muscles in a birds wing.
  931. There are an average of 178 sesame seeds on a McDonald's Big Mac bun.
  932. There are approx. 550 hairs in the eyebrow.
  933. There are four cars and eleven lightposts on the back of a $10 bill.
  934. There are more germs in the human mouth than in the anus.
  935. There are more insects in ten square feet of a rain forest than there are people in Manhattan.
  936. There are more people alive today than have ever died.
  937. There are more Samoans in Los Angeles than on American Samoa.
  938. There are more television sets in the United States than there are people in Japan.
  939. There are more than 40,000 characters in Chinese script.
  940. There are no clocks in Las Vegas gambling casinos.
  941. There are no rivers in Saudi Arabia.
  942. There are one million stray dogs in the New York City metropolitan area.
  943. There are seven points on the Statue of Liberty's crown.
  944. There are six million trees in the Forrest of Martyrs near Jerusalem, symbolizing the Jewish death toll in World War II.
  945. There are, on average, 42 typos in a daily paper.
  946. There is a phenomenon called the last laugh. A bullet shot through a victim's heart sometimes precipitates a final laugh before death.
  947. There is a sport called purring which enjoys popularity in Wales. Two opponents stand face-to-face, grasping each other firmly by the shoulders. At the starting signal, they begin kicking each other in the shins with shoes reinforced with metal toeplates. The first man to release his grip on his opponent's shoulders is the loser.
  948. There is a town in Sweden called A and a town in France called Y.
  949. There is approximately one chicken for every human being in the world.
  950. There is enough fuel in the tank of a jumbo jet to drive an average car around the world four times.
  951. There is more pigment in brown eyes than there is in blue eyes.
  952. There is no known way for a submarine to communicate with land via radio when underwater.
  953. There is no record that Jesus either laughed or smiled.
  954. There is only one animal that can completely turn its stomach inside out. The starfish.
  955. There was once a town in West Virginia called 6.
  956. There were no squirrels on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts until 1989.
  957. There’s only one inanimate sign of the Zodiac: Libra.
  958. There's a law in Chicago that prohibits folks from feeding whiskey to canines.
  959. There's a law in International Falls, Minnesota, which states it's illegal for cats to chase dogs up telephone poles in that city.
  960. They can't be sure why, but it is best to put a dog up on a table to groom it. It's not just for the groomer's comfort. Something about the altitude simmers a pup down.
  961. Thomas Edison had a collection of 5,000 birds.
  962. Thomas Edison was afraid of the dark.
  963. Thomas Jefferson did not sign the Constitution. He was in France during the convention, where he served as the U.S. minister.
  964. Though Switzerland is a neutral country, it has compulsory military service.
  965. Thrity-five percent of the people who use personal ads for dating are already married.
  966. Tibetans, Mongolians, and people in parts of western China put salt in their tea instead of sugar.
  967. To preserve their elaborate coiffures, geishas in ancient Japan slept with their heads in bags filled with buckwheat chaff.
  968. Today’s average household in the USA contains more computer power than existed in the world before 1965.
  969. Toilet paper was invented in 1857.
  970. Turkey has a ban on kissing in films.
  971. Turtles don't have any teeth.
  972. Twelve or more cows is called a flink.
  973. Twenty percent of all road accidents in Sweden involve a moose.
  974. Two mouths full of cowbane, a member of the carrot family, is enough to kill you.
  975. Typewriter is the longest word that can be made using the letters on only one row of the keyboard.
  976. Until the 1950s, Tibetans disposed of their dead by taking the body up a hill, hacking it into little pieces, and feeding the remains to the birds.
  977. Volleyball is the most popular sport played in American nudist camps.
  978. We tie shoes to the cars of newlyweds because shoes are related to feet, and feet have long been considered phallic symbols. Tying shoes to the car serves the same purpose as throwing rice, it's a wish for the couple's fertility.
  979. Weevils are more resistant to poisons in the morning than at night.
  980. Whales die if their echo system fails.
  981. What is called a French kiss in England and America is known as an English kiss in France.
  982. When a giraffe's baby is born, it falls from a height of six feet--usually without being hurt.
  983. When a horned toad is angry, it squirts blood from its eyes.
  984. When a waitress draws a happy face on a check, tips rise 18%, when a waiter does, tips rise 3%.
  985. When glass breaks, the cracks move at speeds of up to 3,000 miles per hour.
  986. When Heinz ketchup leaves the bottle, it travels at a rate of 25 miles per year.
  987. When opossums are playing 'possum, they are not playing. They actually pass out from sheer terror.
  988. When parking meters were first introduced, furious drivers beheaded them with axes.
  989. When people first started sending letters in Britain, it was the recipient who paid the postage.
  990. When Saigon fell, the signal for all Americans to evacuate was Bing Crosby's White Christmas being played on the radio.
  991. When the first duck-billed platypus arrived at the British Museum, the curators thought it was a fake and tried to pull its beak off.
  992. When the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers play football at home to a sellout crowd, the stadium becomes the state's third largest city.
  993. When two dogs approach each other, the one that will be in charge wags its tail very slowly, rather than that quick wag-wag-wag. If both wag slowly, watch out.
  994. When two words are combined to form a single word (breakfast + lunch = brunch) the new word is called a portmanteau.
  995. When used by an ornithologist, the word lore refers to the space between a bird's eye and its bill.
  996. Whence means from where, so from whence is redundant.
  997. Whitby, Ontario has more donut stores per capita than any other place in the world.
  998. Why dogs like squeeze toys so much? They like the sound because it sounds like an animal in distress.
  999. William Butler Yeats wrote his most important poems between the age of 50 and 75.
  1000. William Shakespeare had 11 different ways of spelling his surname.
  1001. William the Conqueror was so strong he could jump on to his horse wearing full armor.
  1002. With few exceptions, birds do not sing while on the ground. They sing during flight or while sitting on an object off the ground.
  1003. Women blink twice as many times as men do.
  1004. You are more likely to be killed by a champagne cork than by a poisonous spider.
  1005. You breathe about 10 million times a year.
  1006. You can make edible cheese from the milk of 24 different mammals.
  1007. You can tell if a skunk is about if you smell only .000000000000071 ounce of its spray.
  1008. You can use pinecones to forecast the weather--the scales will close when rain is on the way.
  1009. You won’t find a 6 in Cameroon phone numbers--the native language has no sound for x.
  1010. Your tongue is the only muscle in your body that is attached at only one end.
  1011. Your urine will turn bright yellow if you eat too much asparagus.
  1012. Zebras can't see the color orange.
Courtesy of Earnest Speakers